Ancestral Voices - March 4, 2018

March 4, 2018 - MacKenzie Art Gallery

Tickets
Adult - $25  |  Student - $15

The journey towards reconciliation starts with understanding.  The final evening of the Forward Currents Festival presents a mix of pieces that challenges us to re-examine the familiar through a new lens. Powerhouse Saskatchewan-born singer/songwriter Andrea Menard closes the festival with a presentation of her original work exploring her unique perspective as a Métis jazz singer.


Sunday, March 4, 2018 – 7:00pm (Artist Talk – 6:15pm)
Gordon Gerrard, conductor
Marion Newman, soprano
Andrea Menard, singer/songwriter
Regina Symphony Orchestra

The journey towards reconciliation starts with understanding the truth. The final evening of the Forward Currents Festival presents a mix of pieces that challenges us to re-examine what we have understood through a new lens. Powerhouse Saskatchewan-born singer/songwriter Andrea Menard closes the festival with a presentation of her original work exploring her unique perspective as a Métis jazz singer.

Jean Sibelius: The Swan of Tuonela 
with Regina Symphony Orchestra

Any attempts at reconciliation will necessarily involve concerted efforts to understand a culture that is not our own. Cultural symbolism can be uniquely useful in this: many symbols have significance and meaning—though very different meaning—in different cultures. The swan is a good example. The swan has its own legends attached to it in European cultures, and it also has significance in Indigenous spirituality, particularly in the Dakota and Lakota traditions. Sibelius’ masterful depiction of the swan, with its plaintive song given to the English horn, gives us an opportunity to examine familiar stories from perspectives that may be entirely new to us.

Bramwell Tovey: Ancestral Voices
with Marion Newman, mezzo-soprano & with Regina Symphony Orchestra

Bramwell Tovey, iconic British-Canadian conductor, pianist, composer and educator has written  this cycle of songs that explore the complex discussions that need to take place around Truth and Reconciliation. The texts present concepts essential to understanding the Truth part of these essential conversations: Indigenous ties to the untouched nature of pre-colonized Canada, the painful truth of residential schools and shared hopes for a reconciled future. Dazzling in their use of the full orchestra, the songs are at times ironically jovial and heart breaking.

Bedrich Smetana: The Moldau
with Regina Symphony Orchestra

The notion of a “Homeland”, and how we as individuals identify with the places we live, is at the heart of discussions centred on Truth and Reconciliation. How the relationship between Indigenous and non-Indigenous people moves forward will continue to involve aspects of homeland as it pertains to identity. While Smetana’s orchestral masterwork has no intended connection with Saskatchewan and Canada, presented in this context, this sweeping tone poem will encourage people to examine what home means, and why it is an important piece of these conversations.

Andrea Menard: I Am Andrea Menard
with Regina Symphony Orchestra

Saskatchewan-born singer/songwriter returns to present her original work focusing on her unique perspective as a Métis jazz singer. In her autobiographical work I Am Andrea Menard, Andrea hopes to remind people of what she calls her “Truth”: that music brings people together and has the power to help us reconcile our differences.